Academic Catalog 2021-2022

Environmental Studies (ENVR)

ENVR 103  -  Ecosystems and Human Influence,  0-4 credits.  

Consideration of basic ecological principles and human influences on ecosystems, emphasizing major environmental problems. This course can also count toward the global studies program.

Frequency: Every Semester  
Core designations: International-Global Prspct G, Natural Science N  
ENVR 107  -  Islands as Microcosms of Our World,  4 credits.  

This course will use island living and the theory of island biogeography to provide students with a foundation in ecological principles needed to understand global environmental problems and frame long-term solutions. Students will work as scientists, acquire a nuanced understanding of biodiversity and current environmental challenges, and consider how they can be responsibly engaged as travelers in the world. This course meets the Natural Science core requirement (N) for Santorini only.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Core designations: International-Global Prspct G, Natural Science N  
ENVR 250  -  Pre-May Seminar,  2 credits.  
Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
ENVR 265 / ENG 265  -  Animal Stories,  4 credits.  

An exploration of literature written about animals and from animal points of view. Topics will include animal consciousness, animal rights, anthropomorphism, anthropocentrism, environmental history, and the human interaction with animals over time as companion species, totems, rivals, and food sources. The course includes excursions, visits, and research with community partners who work with animals.

Frequency: Every Year - First Semester  
Corequisites: PEAK 400  
This course is PEAK Required  
ENVR 300  -  May Seminar,  4 credits.  
Frequency: May Seminar  
ENVR 310 / HIST 310  -  Nature's Place in U.S. History,  4 credits.  

Nature's Place in U.S. History will investigate the relationship between human beings and the natural world and how this relationship has changed over time. The key premise is that nature is an active force shaping U.S. history. This course will integrate nature, place and environmental justice into the more familiar narratives of the American Past. This course can also count toward the environmental and sustainability studies program.

Frequency: Every Year - Second Semester  
Core designations: U.S. Cultural Diversity U, Humanities H  
ENVR 312 / BUSN 312 / SOC 312  -  Global Development Issues,  4 credits.  

Students are introduced to the social scientific approaches used to understand how demographic, institutional, cultural, economic and ecological factors influence, and are influenced by, societal development. Comparative case studies enable students to understand the structure and dynamics (e.g., population change) of human populations as they relate to socioeconomic development. This course can also count towards the Environmental Studies Program.

Frequency: Every Year - First Semester  
Core designations: International-Global Prspct G, Social Science S  
ENVR 327 / BIOL 327  -  Conservation Biology,  0-4 credits.  

Students will develop their understanding of biodiversity, the skills needed to participate in the science and management of Earth's biological systems, and individual perspectives on responsible engagement in the world as scientists and as citizens. Three hours of lab per week or, in alternate years, a ten-day field trip to Florida during Spring Break (an additional fee will be required for the Florida years).

Frequency: Every Year - Second Semester  
Prerequisites: BIOL 221 and CHEM 127  
ENVR 335 / PSC 335  -  Climate Change and Conflict,  4 credits.  

This course will challenge our traditional understanding of what causes armed conflict. We will investigate the possible linkages between climate change and violent conflict. As the 21st century climate deteriorates, will conflict propensity increase around the world? If so, where and why? Special attention will be devoted to the rise of water wars.

Frequency: Alternate Years - 1st Semester  
Core designations: Social Science S  
ENVR 339 / PHIL 339  -  Environmental Ethics,  4 credits.  

This course draws on the world's philosophical traditions, both Eastern and Western, to understand our place within and responsibility for the natural world. The course will consider major theories of ethics (consequentialism, deontologism, virtue ethics) as well as major approaches to environmental philosophy (Social Ecology, Ecofeminism, Deep Ecology). In addition to broad theoretical approaches to the environment, students will use philosophical resources and methods to examine specific environmental issues and controversies.

Frequency: Every Year - First Semester  
Core designations: Humanities H  
ENVR 350 / PSC 350  -  Environmental Policy- Politics,  4 credits.  

One of the greatest challenges of our time is determining how to generate global prosperity while ensuring that the ecological environment in which we live remains healthy enough to continue to support thriving human populations. This course focuses on environmental politics and policy at the national and sub-national levels, examining how various perspectives and interests intersect in the struggle to develop the policies that govern the interaction between humans and the natural environment. It is for all students who wish to prepare themselves to engage with the environmental challenges that will increasingly dominate public life in the coming decades. This course can also count toward the global studies program and the environmental studies program.

Frequency: Every Year - First Semester  
Corequisites: PEAK 400  
This course is PEAK Required  
ENVR 355 / PSC 355  -  Petroleum Politics & Planet,  4 credits.  

This course explores the links between energy, politics, and the environment through several critical topics of global importance associated with our expanding use of energy and its impact on our environment. Alternatives to fossil fuels, such as renewable and efficient energy, will be examined as solutions to our current fossil fuel-based economy, which is unsustainable.

Frequency: Every Year - Second Semester  
ENVR 360 / BIOL 360  -  Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS),  4 credits.  

Students will develop a basic understanding of a GIS and how it is used to make geospatial decisions using the software ArcGIS. Students will learn the use of spatial analytical tools to answer questions and solve problems concerning spatial data, and present their results in professional quality maps. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Three lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. This course can also count toward the global studies program and the environmental and sustainability studies program.

Frequency: Every Year - Second Semester  
ENVR 363 / GER 363  -  Sustainability in Germany,  4 credits.  

This English-language course will focus on sustainability in public discourse in Germany, past and present. Historical overview of the exploitation of natural resources in Germany, followed by examination of contemporary environmental issues. Counts toward German or environmental and sustainability studies majors. Readings in German required only for German credit.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Core designations: Humanities H  
ENVR 365 / PSC 365  -  Global Sustainability Issues,  4 credits.  

This course examines two general categories of global issues - sustainable development and ecological sustainability - and the various interpretive perspectives that offer understandings of each. Integrating the contributions of several disciplines, we examine the historical origins and future trends of these problems, their causes and consequences, and their potential solutions. In addition, students will learn a variety of transferable skills, including the ability to construct policies and negotiate differences among competing interests.

Frequency: Every Year - First Semester  
Core designations: International-Global Prspct G  
ENVR 380  -  Special Topics,  0-4 credits.  

Courses covering various topics of interest in this particular discipline are offered regularly. Contact department or program chair for more information.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
ENVR 390  -  Internship,  1-8 credits.  
Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
ENVR 475  -  Interdisciplinary Research,  4 credits.  

This course examines and applies principles of interdisciplinary research on currently relevant environmental topics of interest to the class. This class is a seminar and is intended to serve as a capstone course for the program.

Frequency: Every Year - Second Semester  
Corequisites: PEAK 400  
This course is PEAK Required  
ENVR 480  -  Independent Study,  1-4 credits.  

This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct in-depth study of a particular topic under the supervision of a faculty member. Contact the department or program chair for more information.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
ENVR 483 / HIST 483  -  Sustainable Communities,  4 credits.  

This course explores the ways human communities are responding to a changing climate. It examines the historical contexts of the problem and emphasizes the strategies communities are adopting to meet the challenge. This course includes vibrant experiential learning opportunities that allow students numerous opportunities to BREW. Open to any major. This course can also count toward the environmental and sustainability studies program.

Frequency: Every Year - First Semester  
ENVR 487  -  Directed Research,  1-4 credits.  

This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct research in a specific area of study, completed under the direction of a faculty mentor. Specific expectations of the research experience to be determined by the faculty. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes