Academic Catalog 2022-2023

World Languages and Cultures

Faculty

Gay G. Rawson, chair

Chinese

Paul Faust
Fulbright Language Teaching Assistant

French

Rachel Dwyer
Gay G. Rawson

German

Jonathan P. Clark
Karin Hillstrom

Italian

David L. Hamilton

Spanish and Hispanic Studies

Alexander Aldrich
Karin Hillstrom
Ady M. Johnson
Ingrid Luna Lopez
Fanny R. Roncal Ramirez
Lisa A. Twomey

Language study has been an integral part of Concordia College since its inception. Norwegian was the first language offered in the 1890s and French, German, and Spanish quickly followed at the beginning of the 20th century. Chinese and Italian were added more recently. The world languages faculty have a long history of innovative language instruction, leading the college in creating study abroad opportunities, founding Concordia Language Villages in 1961 and May Seminars abroad in 1968, and creating a graduate program in world language instruction in 2007.

Concordia College is unique in being able to offer world language students the opportunity to develop their oral proficiency at Concordia Language Villages. In addition to programs in Chinese, French, German, Italian, and Spanish, Concordia students can learn the fundamentals of Arabic, Danish, Finnish, Japanese, Korean, Norwegian, Portuguese, Russian or Swedish through internships in the summer programs for elementary and secondary students.

For specific program information, see the section associated with each language.

Goals for the Department of World Languages and Cultures

The purpose of the Department of World Languages and Cultures is to foster a deep sense of passion, curiosity, discovery, understanding, and connectedness with communities at all levels, from local to global, in order to empower our students to engage and act responsibly in a culturally sensitive and multilingual manner.

Our goal is that, in every class, from 111 to 400-level courses, students will develop the skills, knowledge, and attitudes needed to interact with people who are different from them. We aspire that, by the end of our program, students will go beyond being just responsible global citizens to becoming partners, true partners, alongside people around the world, using our intercultural and communicative competencies.  In order to accomplish this, we endorse the World-Readiness Standards, often referred to as the “5 C’s”.  Each course addresses all modes of communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities.  We expect majors to reach Intermediate-High proficiency in speaking (interpersonal mode of communication) and Advanced-Low in all other areas, including intercultural competence, which is an emphasis in our coursework.

Liberal Arts Core World Languages Requirement

All students who have studied a language prior to coming to Concordia are expected to take a placement test to determine which course level is the most appropriate for their individual ability.  See Exploration courses in the Core Curriculum.

Chinese

The purpose of the Chinese program at Concordia College is to enable students to gain a global vision and sensitivity to other cultures by promoting enjoyment of learning Chinese and nurturing students’ knowledge of Chinese-speaking cultures and civilizations. The Chinese program provides learning experiences that prepare students to achieve the following outcomes:

  • to develop communication skills in the Mandarin Chinese language
  • to gain knowledge and understanding of Chinese-speaking cultures
  • to make connections between Chinese and other disciplines and acquire information in a liberal arts context
  • to develop comparisons based on insight into the nature of the language and culture
  • to participate in multilingual communities at home and around the world

The Chinese program offers students the opportunity to participate in regular activities of the Chinese Club, live in the Chinese language residence, and to interact with Chinese international students and the local Chinese community. Students are encouraged to participate in immersion weekends at Concordia Language Villages, which also offer opportunities for summer employment in the language. Students are strongly encouraged to study abroad and majors may find it necessary to do so in order to complete a sufficient number of upper-level courses. Students should consult with the department about semester and summer opportunities to study in Chinese-speaking areas.

Study Abroad in China

The Chinese program at Concordia College is partnered with Sichuan International Studies University in Chongqing, China, providing intensive Chinese language classes for Concordia College students. One semester study there enables students to earn 16 credits, which can be counted toward the Chinese major as well as the Chinese minor. It is recommended that study abroad in China should occur in the spring semester. Students are advised to study Chinese at Concordia College for two years before pursuing the study abroad program in China.

We also have study away programs with the United International College in Zhuhai, China, the National Taiwan Normal University in Taipei, Taiwan, and the USAC Chiang Mai program in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

French

The purpose of the French program is to foster a deep sense of passion, curiosity, discovery, understanding, and connectedness with the global community in order to empower our students to engage and act responsibly in a culturally sensitive and multilingual manner.

The French program provides learning experiences that prepare students to achieve the following outcomes:

  • to acquire communication skills – listening, speaking, reading and writing – at various levels of proficiency
  • to develop the ability to communicate with people of other cultures in their language
  • to have the opportunity to have direct contact with speakers from France and the Francophone at home and around the world
  • to appreciate the contributions by people of the target civilizations to history, the arts, literature and their established institutions, etc.
  • to acquire a better understanding of the English language and the U.S. culture through comparison with other languages and cultures
  • to stimulate the curiosity and the imagination and motivate to continue the study of languages beyond college to full proficiency

The French program’s on-campus resources for students include the opportunity to live in the Résidence française language residence, the student-run French Club, After-School French teaching, being a counselor at Concordia Language Villages’ French weekend programs, membership in the National French Honor Society (Pi Delta Phi), and more. Off-campus programs provide opportunities for students to study French language and culture through immersion. These include: FREN 300 May Seminar in France or the Francophone World, FREN 490 Practicum in France, study at the University of Rennes in France or the Université François Rabelais in Tours, France; internships with companies in France, exploration seminars, and the opportunity to compete for a French government assistantship. (See Global Learning at Concordia for details.)

German

The German program is a part of the Department of World Languages and Cultures and has as its mission “recognizing and affirming global awareness through the study of the language and cultures of the German-speaking world.” Through coursework and a unique set of on-campus and overseas programs, students achieve high proficiency levels in the German language and attain a high degree of cultural awareness of the German-speaking world.

The German program provides learning experiences that prepare students to achieve the following outcomes:

  • develop communication skills in the German language
  • gain knowledge and understanding of German-speaking cultures
  • make connections with other disciplines
  • develop comparisons based on insight into the nature of the language and culture
  • participate in multilingual communities at home and around the world

The German program prepares students for further study in graduate school and for professional opportunities in many fields, including international business and economics, law, teaching in grades K-8 or K-12, and jobs that require effective communication, critical thinking skills and knowledge of another culture and language. Taken individually or in conjunction with other majors, studies in German will give students a leading edge in a global society and in any professional pursuit.

The German program offers a number of specialized programs both on campus and in Germany. International programs include the Jena Study Abroad program, the Federation of German-American Clubs Scholarship, the USAC Lüneburg, and the International Business program in Germany, which includes a 12-week internship with a German firm and a semester study at the Leibniz Universität Hannover. The German program also offers May Seminars and Exploration Seminars on a regular basis. See course and program descriptions below and consult with the German faculty for details.

The German program also offers a variety of on-campus opportunities for all students interested in German. These include living in a German apartment, part of the International Living Community; study and work opportunities during the summer or school year at Waldsee, the Concordia German Language Village; and teaching German in area elementary schools. Delta Phi Alpha, the National German Honor Society, has an active chapter that recognizes academic excellence and promotes the study of German language, culture and society. The German Club celebrates German culture and language in a non-classroom environment. All students of German are encouraged to participate in these programs, and the German faculty works with each student to afford them the greatest opportunities.

Spanish

The Spanish and Hispanic studies program prepares students for participation in a global society through courses designed to expand their knowledge and understanding of the language, cultures and perceptions of the Spanish-speaking world. The goals for the Spanish major are based on the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Language’s National Standards for Foreign Language Learning. The Spanish and Hispanic studies program provides learning experiences that prepare students to achieve the following outcomes:

  • develop communication skills in the Spanish language
  • gain knowledge and understanding of Spanish-speaking cultures
  • make connections between Spanish and other disciplines
  • develop comparisons based on insight into the nature of the language and the culture
  • be enabled to participate in multilingual communities at home and around the world

Courses in Hispanic studies are taught in English and support interdisciplinary programs in global studies and international business.

The Spanish and Hispanic studies program sponsors many opportunities for students to immerse themselves in the language and culture of Spanish-speaking countries. There are several study abroad opportunities, including Concordia’s own fall semester in Segovia, Spain; fall or spring semester or both through Spanish studies abroad in Cordoba (Argentina) or Seville and Alicante (Spain); and Summer Study programs in various locations in both Spain and Latin America.

On campus, the Spanish and Hispanic studies program provides many resources and opportunities for students. The Casa Hispana language apartments, located on the third floor of Bogstad Manor, provide the opportunity for students to spend the entire academic year living in a Spanish language and cultural environment. Participation in the national Spanish Honor Society Sigma Delta Pi is open by invitation to students who meet the membership criteria. It also sponsors an honors program for exceptional students. (For details on these programs, see Expanded Academic Opportunities, or consult with the program coordinator.) Students also have off-campus opportunities to immerse themselves in Spanish through our collaboration with the Moorhead Public Schools Spanish Immersion Program and at Concordia Language Villages.

Programs

Majors

Minors

Honors

World Languages and Cultures Honors Program

The Department of World Languages and Cultures (WLC) has honors programs for the following languages:

  • Chinese
  • French
  • German
  • Spanish

Who

A major in one of the aforementioned languages who meets all of the following criteria is invited to submit an application for entrance into the Honors Program:

  1. The completion of two 300-level language classes
  2. GPA of 3.5 or higher in the target language major
  3. An overall cumulative Concordia GPA of 3.5 or above

Timeline: How and When to Apply

The application for entrance into the Honors Program should be submitted to the Department Chair during the second 300-level course taken, at the earliest, and no later than midsemester break of the first semester of the senior year. Application forms are available in the WLC Department office (120 Academy) or from your adviser. The application will include an essay written in the target language.

Note that the application to the Honors Program must be made before the student completes the first of the two courses in which the honors projects are housed.

Please also note that students may submit an appeal in the case of a requested exception to the approved timeline and explain the special circumstances warranting their alternative timeline.

Participants will be notified of acceptance into the program within one month after submitting their completed application.

What

There are two projects that must be completed for the WLC Honors Program housed in two separate upper-level courses.

The projects should take the student deeper into the course subject and result in an experience that is highly relevant to the course content, student interests, and the student’s future professional preparation. For the faculty member, the project should be an opportunity to try innovative or professionally interesting projects or activities that would be difficult to do for an entire class. Honors projects have the following goals:

  1. Address critical thinking across disciplines,
  2. Demonstrate communication of professional or scholarly work,
  3. Show a synthesis of academic research and course themes,
  4. Foster personal growth through leadership, and
  5. Stimulate intellectual curiosity and lifelong learning.

Any variation from this program must be successfully petitioned to the WLC department faculty.

Students who successfully complete the two required projects and maintain the needed GPA will be recognized in the Honors Convocation program and will have Chinese / French / German / Spanish Honors (as appropriate) listed as their major in the graduation program, on their transcripts, and on their diplomas.

  1. Project One: An extended independent academic research paper and public presentation
    Students must write extended papers (10 pages in the target language) for the honors major. The course that houses this paper needs to be at the 300-level or higher. The nature and scope of each paper will be arranged with the instructor of each course. Students must demonstrate a significant amount of independent research according to guidelines established by the department and receive grades of A- or above on the papers. Students must also give a public oral presentation (in the target language) of the paper. This may be to the class for which the paper is written, at the Celebration of Student Scholarship (COSS), at a community presentation, or other suitable venue. WLC faculty will be invited to attend.
  2. Project 2: A choice of activity that must be approved by the course instructor and WLC Department. All activities must result in some kind of a polished writing in the target language and a public presentation or performance, to which WLC faculty will be invited. Some ideas include:
    1. Write a second extended academic independent research paper and public presentation (at least 10 pages written in the target language), and present it in the target language (or English depending on the audience and goals).
    2. Complete a new assignment that encourages interdisciplinary learning of the material such as screening a related film, writing a poem or script, having a performance, etc. Write a reflection in the target language and disseminate the work publicly.
    3. Develop and complete a service learning component that relates to a class assignment. Write a reflection in the target language. Present about the process and experience publicly.
    4. Complete additional readings from texts connected to course themes and reflect on them in writing. Present findings to the class.
    5. Identify and interview experts and native speakers to understand further content related to course themes. Write a reflection in the target language. Present the findings publicly.
    6. Start a book club using a related text and schedule outside of class meetings. Write a reflection in the target language. Present the findings, process and experience publicly.
    7. Develop and complete a short-term study abroad experience related to course themes. Write a reflection in the target language. Present about the process and experience publicly.
    8. Prepare materials to lead a classroom discussion or present a lecture. Submit written lesson plan and all materials.
    9. Design and complete an internship or field experience to augment classroom learning. Write a reflection in the target language. Present the findings, process and experience publicly.
    10. Compile a reading list or annotated bibliography that explores the topic in more detail. Present the findings.
    11. Develop and prepare a poster presentation on a topic related to course themes.
    12. Design an experiment and conduct research related to course themes. Write a reflection in the target language. Present the findings, process and experience publicly.
    13. Create an art project related to course themes that is presented at an exhibition, such as designing or recreating a famous dress, sculpture, painting, etcetera.
    14. Other projects defined by the student and course supervising faculty members and approved by WLC department.

Note: All creative projects must have two components:

  1. The creative work itself (creative writing, choreography/performance, screenplay, art exhibit or portfolio, musical composition or recital, film, etc.) including a public performance or presentation explaining the creative process
  2. A short (5 pages minimum) written reflection that accompanies the creative work and works as a substantial introduction or afterword to the creative portion of the project
    A good written reflection has the following components:
    1. An analysis of the creative process undertaken by the student
      1. A discussion of materials (texts, films, art, choreography, etc.), offers examples of techniques, approaches and traditions that helped the student in shaping the project
      2. and/or a discussion of how the project engages with theoretical works/debates/approaches in the chosen creative medium/media
      3. and a discussion of some specific aspects of the actual project, including decision making, creative directions, etc.
    2. A discussion of the project’s successes and limitations
    3. A short account of the research that went into the entire project

Courses

Courses Offered during Alternate Years

2022-23

  • FREN/WLC 317 - Race, Gender, and Power in the Francophone World, 4 credits (scheduled for Spring 2023)

2023-24

  • FREN 311 - Intensive Oral and Written Communication, 4 credits (scheduled for Fall 2023)
  • FREN 331 - French Culture and Civilization, 4 credits (scheduled for Spring 2024)

2024-25

  • FREN 360 - French in the Business World, 4 credits (scheduled for Fall 2024)
  • FREN 255 - Pre-Study Abroad: France, 2 credits (scheduled for Spring 2025)
  • FREN 340 - French Phonetics and Other Linguistics Issues, 2 credits (schedules for Spring 2025)

Chinese

CHIN 111  -  Beginning Chinese I,  4 credits.  

The beginning sequence of two courses designed to introduce students to the skills needed for proficiency in the language and culture of Mandarin China. Combines active practice and communication with grammatical analysis of the language.

Frequency: Every Year - First Semester  
CHIN 112  -  Beginning Chinese II,  4 credits.  

The second semester of a two-course sequence designed to introduce students to the skills needed for proficiency in the language and culture of China. Combines active practice and communication with grammatical analysis of the language.

Frequency: Every Year - Second Semester  
Prerequisites: CHIN 111  
Core designations: World Language W  
CHIN 113  -  Accelerated Beginning Chinese,  4 credits.  

Designed for students with some previous study of Chinese, experience in a Chinese-speaking country, or study of another language, this course develops existing language skills to form a solid foundation of the Chinese language and Chinese-speaking cultures. Students learn to communicate in Chinese and about different Chinese-speaking cultures to develop greater intercultural competence.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Core designations: World Language W  
CHIN 211  -  Intermediate Chinese I,  4 credits.  

This course will continue to systematically build students' abilities in listening, speaking, reading and writing in the Chinese language and prepare students for advanced Chinese study. Students will continue the development of awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of Chinese-speaking cultures.

Frequency: Every Year - First Semester  
Prerequisites: CHIN 112  
Core designations: World Language W  
CHIN 212  -  Intermediate Chinese II,  4 credits.  

This course will continue to systematically build students' abilities in listening, speaking, reading and writing in the Chinese language and prepare students for advanced Chinese study. Students will continue the development of awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of Chinese-speaking cultures.

Frequency: Every Year - Second Semester  
Prerequisites: CHIN 211  
Core designations: World Language W  
CHIN 311  -  Chin Conversation/Composition,  4 credits.  

CHIN 311 is designed to help students who have completed two years of Chinese acquire advanced knowledge of the language, improve reading comprehension skills, and further develop the students' overall proficiency in speaking and writing through reading and discussion of a variety of topics related to Chinese contemporary society and culture. Students will also be presented with language tasks such as reading Chinese literature, current newspaper articles and stories, presenting reports, debating current issues, writing summaries and opinions, and doing grammatical exercises.

Frequency: Alternate Years - 1st Semester  
Prerequisites: CHIN 212  
Core designations: World Language W  
CHIN 312  -  Advanced Writing and Conversation,  4 credits.  

Advanced Writing and Converstaion is designed to help students who have completed two years of Chinese acquire advanced knowledge of the language with focus to enhance the students' oral proficiency and further develop their writing skills through reading and discussion of a variety of topics related to Chinese contemporary society and culture. Students will also be presented with language tasks such as reading Chinese literature, current newspaper articles and stories; presenting reports debating current issues; writing summaries and opinions and doing grammatical exercises.

Frequency: Alternate Years - 1st Semester  
Prerequisites: CHIN 212  
Core designations: World Language W  
CHIN 370  -  Global Political, Social, Economic and Environmental Issues in the Chinese-Speaking World,  3,4 credits.  

Students develop greater understanding of global political, social, economic, and environmental issues through intensive study of authentic target language materials. Through projects, papers, presentations, and opportunities to collaborate with native speakers, participants develop intercultural communicative competence and target-language proficiency. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Intermediate or Advanced proficiency in the target language required.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
CHIN 380  -  Special Topics,  0-4 credits.  

Courses covering various topics of interest in this particular discipline are offered regularly. Contact program chair for more information.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
CHIN 385  -  Topics in Chinese Society,  4 credits.  

Selected topics inherent in Chinese society. Students in this class will apply the language skills they have acquired to explore and analyze topics and phenomena associated with Chinese society. Topics will focus on history, film, literature, or linguistics. Repeat credit is allowed for varying topics.

Frequency: Every Year - Second Semester  
Prerequisites: CHIN 311 or CHIN 312  
Core designations: World Language W  
Repeatable: Yes  
CHIN 390  -  Cooperative Education,  1-8 credits.  
Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
CHIN 395  -  Cooperative Education at the Concordia Language Villages,  1-4 credits.  

This course is intended to provide students of modern languages with opportunities to teach and study the language of their choice at the Concordia Language Villages. Prerequisite for acceptance: at least two years of coursework or the equivalent in the language. The final decision on acceptance into this course is based on mutual agreement of both Concordia language department faculty and Concordia Language Villages faculty concerning both the student and the project. A total maximum equivalent of two full courses from 390 and 395 may be counted toward graduation.

Frequency: Every Semester  
Corequisites: PEAK 400  
This course is PEAK Required  
CHIN 480  -  Independent Study,  1-4 credits.  

This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct in-depth study of a particular topic under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Contact the program chair for more information.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
CHIN 487  -  Directed Research,  1-4 credits.  

This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct research in a specific area of study, completed under the direction of a faculty mentor. Specific expectations of the research experience to be determined by the faculty. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  

French

FREN 111  -  Beginning French I,  4 credits.  

Students learn the basics of French communication and are introduced to the cultures of the French-speaking world. Students engage in various individual, class and group activities to develop their ability to speak and understand French. Resources, including the World Wide Web, CD-ROMs, French children's books, movies and magazines are used to increase students' understanding of French culture and the French language.

Frequency: Every Year - First Semester  
FREN 112  -  Beginning French II,  4 credits.  

Students learn the basics of French communication and are introduced to the cultures of the French-speaking world. Students engage in various individual, class and group activities to develop their ability to speak and understand French. Resources, including the World Wide Web, CD-ROMs, French children's books, movies and magazines are used to increase students' understanding of French culture and the French language. Students will also have the opportunity to interact with the local community through cultural projects.

Frequency: Every Year - Second Semester  
Prerequisites: FREN 111  
Core designations: World Language W  
FREN 113  -  Accelerated Beginning French,  4 credits.  

Designed for students with previous study of French, experience in a French-speaking country, or study of another romance language, this course develops existing language skills to form a solid foundation of the French language and Francophone cultures. Students learn to communicate in French and about Francophone cultures to develop greater intercultural competence.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis, Summer Session  
Core designations: World Language W  
FREN 199  -  Exploration Seminar,  0 credits.  
Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
FREN 211  -  Intermediate French I,  4 credits.  

This course is an approved U.S. perspectives course and focuses on "French in the Americas" featuring units on Canada, the United States (Louisiana, New England and Native Americans), South America, and the Caribbean Islands. After a general introduction to each site, the course examines a different theme such as family life, youth, educational systems, and everyday lives. These discussions are not possible without discussing race, ethnicity, gender and social issues such as education, class and religion. This course is also designed to increase students' ability to speak, write, read and understand French. Students review basic language structures and vocabulary, as well as develop new language skills. In addition to class meetings on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, students also work with the French native assistant for small-group discussions and projects, usually on Tuesday and Thursday at an agreed upon time.

Frequency: Every Year - First Semester  
Prerequisites: FREN 112  
Core designations: U.S. Cultural Diversity U, World Language W  
FREN 212  -  Intermediate French II,  4 credits.  

This course is an approved global perspectives course and focuses on "French in the Francophone World" featuring various regions in France as well as Asia, the Pacific Islands, and Africa. After a general introduction to each site, the course examines different cultural components. This course is also designed to increase students' ability to speak, write, read and understand French. Students review basic language structures and vocabulary, as well as develop new language skills. In addition to class meetings on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, students also work with the French native assistant for small-group discussions and projects, usually on Tuesday and Thursday at an agreed upon time.

Frequency: Every Year - Second Semester  
Prerequisites: FREN 211  
Core designations: International-Global Prspct G, World Language W  
FREN 220  -  The Best of French Literature,  4 credits.  

This course, taught in English, enables students without a background in French language or in French literature to share in this rich heritage. The primary goal of the course is the appreciation and enjoyment of fine literature. The masterpieces selected, beginning with a few legends and farces of the Middles Ages, trace the evolution of social, religious, political and economic aspects of the French civilization.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
FREN 250  -  Pre-May Seminar: Francophone World,  4 credits.  

Designed to prepare the student for a meaningful period of study and travel in the Francophone world, this course is required as preparation for FREN 300 - May Seminar and is required of students preparing for certification by the Minnesota Board of Teaching.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Prerequisites: FREN 212  
FREN 255  -  Pre-Study Abroad: France,  2 credits.  

Designed to prepare the student for a meaningful period of study and travel in France, this course is required as preparation for FREN 300 - May Seminar and is required of students preparing for certification by the Minnesota Board of Teaching.

Frequency: Every Third Year  
Prerequisites: FREN 212  
FREN 300  -  May Seminar,  4 credits.  
Frequency: May Seminar  
FREN 305  -  Francophone Trivia,  1 credits.  

In this asynchronous, self-paced course, learners study topics related to Francophone cultures and the French language. Students may take this course multiple times to improve and refine their language skills and cultural knowledge. Students complete an external assessment of their proficiency level, providing them an internationally-recognized credential for future employers.

Frequency: Every Year - Second Semester  
Prerequisites: FREN 212 (may be taken concurrently)  
Repeatable: Yes  
FREN 310  -  Understanding Health, History, and Culture in Southeast Asia,  4 credits.  

This course, taught in English, examines the health, history, and culture of Southeast Asian Francophone countries to understand how these facets work together to impact the mentality and present-day situation in the target country/countries. Interviews with natives from the target culture enhance understanding of how language, culture, history, and health practices inform identity. Work on global health practices and perspectives lends to the interdisciplinary nature of this course.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Prerequisites: FREN 112  
FREN 311  -  Intensive Oral and Written Communication,  4 credits.  

This course is designed to develop students' ability to organize clearly and communicate effectively in French their own knowledge and ideas, as well as the meaning of cultural texts dealing with France. Students are assisted in transferring grammatical concepts to practical communication skills through oral and written practice. In addition to class meetings on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, students also work with the French native assistant for small-group discussions and projects, usually on Tuesday and Thursday at an agreed upon time. Students will also discover the world of children and adolescent literature. Prerequisite:

Frequency: Every Third Year  
Prerequisites: FREN 212  
Core designations: International-Global Prspct G, World Language W  
FREN 317 / WLC 317  -  Race, Gender, and Power in the Francophone World,  4 credits.  

This course, taught in English, examines Francophone texts from a variety of media to understand better the impact of power, racial, gender, and economic relationships on the French-speaking world from a historical/contemporary perspective. We cover Africa, the Americas, Asia and Europe. This course counts toward the global studies, women & gender studies, and international business programs. Students may apply this course to fulfill either the humanities or world language core designation, but not both.

Frequency: Every Third Year  
Prerequisites: FREN 331  
Core designations: U.S. Cultural Diversity U, Humanities H  
FREN 331  -  French Culture and Civilization,  4 credits.  

This is a survey of the history and development of French civilization and of the Francophone world. The course, and all work, is conducted in French. Students may apply this course to fulfill either the humanities or world language core designation, but not both.

Frequency: Every Third Year  
Prerequisites: FREN 311  
Core designations: Humanities H  
FREN 340  -  French Phonetics and Other Linguistics Issues,  2 credits.  

This course is designed for students interested in understanding the sound system of French. Students will learn the International Phonetic Alphabet and the standard pronunciation of the phonetic symbols in French. Using these symbols, they will learn to improve their own pronunciation and comprehension of spoken French. In addition, students will be introduced to the history and geography of the French language, examine linguistic issues in French that derive from its Latin heritage with Germanic influence, and linguistic issues of the Francophone world today. This course is required in order to meet the Minnesota Board of Teaching standards for K-8 and K-12 licensures.

Frequency: Every Third Year  
Prerequisites: FREN 331  
FREN 350  -  Francophone Films,  4 credits.  

This course introduces students to understanding identity issues through the analysis of contemporary films by Sub-Saharan Francophone and Caribbean directors: viewing African experience through African eyes.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Prerequisites: FREN 331  
Core designations: World Language W  
FREN 360  -  French in the Business World,  4 credits.  

Intended for students interested in using French in the workplace, the course concentrates on understanding French business culture and practices and economics. This course can also count toward the global studies program.

Frequency: Every Third Year  
Prerequisites: FREN 331  
Core designations: World Language W  
FREN 370  -  Global Political, Social, Economic and Environmental Issues in the French-Speaking World,  3,4 credits.  

Students develop greater understanding of global political, social, economic, and environmental issues through intensive study of authentic target language materials. Through projects, papers, presentations, and opportunities to collaborate with native speakers, participants develop intercultural communicative competence and target-language proficiency. Intermediate or Advanced proficiency in the target language required.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Prerequisites: FREN 331  
Core designations: World Language W  
Repeatable: Yes  
FREN 380  -  Special Topics,  0-4 credits.  

Courses covering various topics of interest in this particular discipline are offered regularly. Contact department or program chair for more information.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
FREN 390  -  Cooperative Education,  1-8 credits.  
Frequency: Every Semester, Summer Session  
Repeatable: Yes  
FREN 395  -  Cooperative Education at the Concordia Language Villages,  1-4 credits.  

This course is intended to provide students of modern languages with opportunities to teach and study the language of their choice at the Concordia Language Villages. Prerequisite for acceptance: at least two years of course work or the equivalent in the language. The final decision on acceptance into this course is based on mutual agreement of both Concordia language department faculty and Concordia Language Village faculty concerning both the student and the project. A total maximum equivalent of two full courses from 390 and 395 may be counted toward graduation.

Frequency: Every Semester  
Corequisites: PEAK 400  
This course is PEAK Required  
FREN 410  -  Introduction to French Literature Through Poetry,  2 credits.  

This course introduces students to literature through poetry from throughout the French-speaking world. Students will develop analytical skills, an understanding of the development of literature and an appreciation of the impact of culture on literature. This course can also count toward the global studies program.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Prerequisites: FREN 331  
FREN 411  -  Development of French Theatre,  4 credits.  

This study of the French theatre from its origin in the Middle Ages to the present places emphasis on the classical theatre. This course can also count toward the global studies program.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Prerequisites: FREN 331  
FREN 412  -  Development of French Prose,  4 credits.  

Students examine the development of prose writing in the French-speaking world in its various forms from the Middle Ages to the present. This course can also count toward the global studies program.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Prerequisites: FREN 331  
FREN 413  -  Advanced Composition and Grammar,  2 credits.  

This course is designed for students who have completed a study abroad experience such as the May Seminar or a practicum or who have completed another upper-division French course. This course will clarify grammar and syntax issues, as well as improve writing skills.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis, Summer Session  
Prerequisites: (FREN 255 and FREN 360 and FREN 370 and FREN 411 and FREN 412) or FREN 490  
FREN 480  -  Independent Study,  1-4 credits.  

This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct in-depth study of a particular topic under the supervision of a faculty member. Contact the department or program chair for more information.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
FREN 487  -  Directed Research,  1-4 credits.  

This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct research in a specific area of study, completed under the direction of a faculty mentor. Specific expectations of the research experience to be determined by the faculty. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
FREN 490  -  Practicum,  4 credits.  

The practicum is a living and learning experience in France generally lasting at least two months, but which may be extended over a longer period of time. The student lives with selected families in France and completes written assignments. The practicum may be arranged for either the summer or a portion of the school year.

Frequency: Every Semester, Summer Session  
Prerequisites: FREN 300  
Corequisites: PEAK 400  
This course is PEAK Required  
Repeatable: Yes  

German

GER 111  -  Introduction to the German-Speaking World I,  4 credits.  

Introduction to the German language through insight into the contemporary life and culture of German-speaking countries. Proficiency in German language and culture developed through a variety of media and concrete situations, actively using many of the basic structures of everyday conversation and writing.

Frequency: Every Year - First Semester  
GER 112  -  Introduction to the German-Speaking World II,  4 credits.  

Continuation of GER 111 - Introduction to the German-Speaking World I

Frequency: Every Year - Second Semester  
Prerequisites: GER 111  
Core designations: World Language W  
GER 113  -  Accelerated Beginning German,  3,4 credits.  

Designed for students with previous study of German, experience in a German-speaking country, or study of another related language, this course develops existing language skills to form a solid foundation of the German language and Germanic cultures. Students learn to communicate in German and about different German-speaking cultures to develop greater intercultural competence. Pre-requisite: Qualifying placement test score or permission of instructor.

Frequency: Summer Session  
Core designations: World Language W  
GER 199  -  Exploration Seminar,  0 credits.  
Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
GER 211  -  Intermediate German I: Culture and Society through the Media,  4 credits.  

Increases oral and written proficiency in German through investigation of German culture and society. Insight into everyday life in Germany will be gained through a variety of media - texts, journals, film, Internet and satellite broadcasts - and form the basis of classroom activities. Grammar review is done regularly and according to students' needs.

Frequency: Every Year - First Semester  
Prerequisites: GER 112  
Core designations: International-Global Prspct G, World Language W  
GER 212  -  Intermediate German II: Culture Through Literature,  4 credits.  

Further development of German language and cultural proficiency through the discussion of literary works and film. Particular emphasis placed on reading and the logical presentation of ideas in speaking and writing.

Frequency: Every Year - Second Semester  
Prerequisites: GER 211  
Core designations: International-Global Prspct G, World Language W  
GER 220  -  Wittenberg Summer Program,  4-6 credits.  

Five-week immersion program in Wittenberg, Germany, which includes content-based language instruction, homestays, and excursions to historical and cultural centers.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
GER 221  -  Germany after the Fall of the Wall,  4 credits.  

College credit course offered at Concordia Language Villages for advanced high school juniors and seniors. Discussion of contemporary issues in Germany since the events of November 1989 and the unification of Germany.

Frequency: Summer Session  
GER 250  -  Pre-May Seminar,  4 credits.  

Designed to prepare students to participate on May Seminar through in-depth discussion of main focus and practical tips on getting around overseas, including the most appropriate travel vocabulary and insight into the countries and cultures to be visited. Students begin a research project that will be completed as part of GER 300 - May Seminar.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
GER 300  -  May Seminar,  4 credits.  
Frequency: May Seminar  
GER 311  -  Advanced Composition and Style,  4 credits.  

A thorough review of German grammar and the opportunity to apply that understanding to writing, speaking and reading. In preparation for advanced courses, a longer work is read and used as the basis for discussion and various forms of writing, as well as a springboard for learning effective vocabulary acquisition techniques.

Frequency: Every Year - First Semester  
Prerequisites: GER 212  
Core designations: International-Global Prspct G, World Language W  
GER 320  -  German Cultural History in Overview,  4 credits.  

Broad overview of the cultural development of German-speaking countries from the very beginnings through 1848. Particular emphasis given to artistic, linguistic, architectural and historical trends from which current German culture and society has evolved. This course can also count toward the global studies program.

Frequency: Alternate Years - 1st Semester  
Prerequisites: GER 212  
Core designations: Humanities H  
GER 325  -  Germany, Austria, and Switzerland Today,  4 credits.  

An overview of German, Austrian, and Swiss geography, recent history, politics, economy, and society. Discussion of the role of the German-speaking countries in the EU and of current social issues, including, education, social welfare, environmentalism, immigration, and right-wing extremism. Conducted in German.

Frequency: Alternate Years - 2nd Semester  
Prerequisites: GER 212  
GER 330  -  Introduction to German Literature and Film,  4 credits.  

Basics of textual analysis through both literature and film, in theory and practice, and an overview of major periods and genres. Main emphasis is placed on developing a critical understanding and appreciation of literary works and films through close reading or sequence analysis, classroom discussion, and written assignments. Students will be introduced to German scholarship and research methods.

Frequency: Alternate Years - 1st Semester  
Prerequisites: GER 212  
Core designations: Arts R  
GER 332  -  German Grammar and Phonetics,  4 credits.  

Thorough review of German grammar and pronunciation including extensive exercises. Includes basic descriptive linguistics (morphology, syntax, phonetics, phonology, sociolinguistics). Required for world language teaching licensure in German.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Prerequisites: GER 212  
GER 360  -  German Contributions to World Culture: Courses in English,  4 credits.  

Consideration of the way in which German-speaking countries have influenced other national cultures. Themes vary. Only 4 credits may count toward major. This course can also count toward the global studies program.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
GER 362 / MUS 362  -  The German Art Song,  4 credits.  

An interdisciplinary collaboration between the German Department and the Music Department that focuses on the cultural history of the Romantic era with special consideration of the poets and poetry with the great musicians of the time, Schubert, Schumann and others, chosen for their compositions. Students perform for each other in Salon Evenings, much as young people in the 19th Century did. An exploration course to Vienna is offered as part of the course.

Frequency: Alternate Years - 2nd Semester  
Core designations: Arts R, International-Global Prspct G  
GER 363 / ENVR 363  -  Sustainability in Germany,  4 credits.  

This English-language course will focus on sustainability in public discourse in Germany, past and present. Historical overview of the exploitation of natural resources in Germany, followed by examination of contemporary environmental issues. Counts toward German or environmental and sustainability studies majors. Readings in German required only for German credit.

Frequency: Alternate Years - 2nd Semester  
Prerequisites: GER 212  
Core designations: Humanities H  
GER 370  -  Global Political, Social, Economic and Environmental Issues in the German-Speaking World,  3,4 credits.  

Students develop greater understanding of global political, social, economic, and environmental issues through intensive study of authentic target language materials. Through projects, papers, presentations, and opportunities to collaborate with native speakers, participants develop intercultural communicative competence and target-language proficiency. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Intermediate or Advanced proficiency in the target language required.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis, Summer Session  
Repeatable: Yes  
GER 380  -  Special Topics,  0-4 credits.  

Courses covering various topics of interest in this particular discipline are offered regularly. Contact department or program chair for more information.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
GER 390  -  Cooperative Education,  1-8 credits.  
Frequency: Every Semester  
Repeatable: Yes  
GER 395  -  Cooperative Learning at CLV,  1-4 credits.  

This course is intended to provide students of modern languages with opportunities to teach and study the language of their choice at the Concordia Language Villages. Prerequisite for acceptance: at least two years of course work or the equivalent in the language. The final decision on acceptance into this course is based on mutual agreement of both Concordia language department faculty and Concordia Language Village faculty concerning both the student and the project. A total maximum equivalent of two full courses from 390 and 395 may be counted toward graduation.

Frequency: Every Semester  
Corequisites: PEAK 400  
This course is PEAK Required  
GER 423  -  Topics in Society, Politics and Economics,  2 credits.  

Investigation into topics which affect the society of the German-speaking world. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the EU, environment and sustainability, the Third Reich, witchcraft, and the History of Jews in German-speaking Europe. This course can also count towards the Global Studies Program.

Frequency: Every Third Year  
Repeatable: Yes  
GER 424  -  Topics in Literature, Art and Music,  2 credits.  

Investigation into topics of cultural history in the German-speaking world. Topics may include, but are not limited to, Baroque Literature and Art, The Art Song, The Faust Tradition, Worpswede, and Reformation Art. This course can also count towards the Global Studies Program.

Frequency: Every Third Year  
Repeatable: Yes  
GER 430  -  Topics in German Literature,  4 credits.  

Examines German literature with a focus on literary movements, genres, and representative works from major authors. Special attention given to sociohistorical contexts. The course will be conducted in German and English online with synchronous virtual classroom and threaded discussion forums. Students may take the course in English only or with German-language component.

Frequency: Every Third Year  
Prerequisites: GER 212  
Core designations: Arts R  
Repeatable: Yes  
GER 440  -  Topics in German Film,  4 credits.  

Special topics in literature and film, including the History of German Film, Films by German Women, New German Cinema, and Films of the Weimar Republic and the Third Reich. This course can also count toward the global studies program, the film studies program, and the women's and gender studies program.

Frequency: Every Third Year  
Repeatable: Yes  
GER 450  -  Study Abroad Experience and Reflection,  4 credits.  

Students on semester and year-long programs reflect upon their many experiences in an online blog and relate these experiences to an issue of global significance. Topics for this blog will be worked out between the instructor and the student and should reflect their everyday experiences. These entries form the basis of a more directed and polished paper on a topic of interest that deals with a global issue.

Frequency: Every Year - Second Semester  
Prerequisites: GER 212  
GER 480  -  Independent Study,  1-4 credits.  

This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct in-depth study of a particular topic under the supervision of a faculty member. Contact the department or program chair for more information.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
GER 487  -  Directed Research,  1-4 credits.  

This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct research in a specific area of study, completed under the direction of a faculty mentor. Specific expectations of the research experience to be determined by the faculty. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
GER 490  -  Practicum,  2,4 credits.  

Opportunity to earn college credit for exploration of various aspects of German-speaking culture and society. The practicum may be arranged for either the summer or the school year. Approval by the German department is required before departure.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  

Hispanic Studies

HISP 210 / GS 210  -  Introduction to Latin American Studies,  4 credits.  

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of Latin American Studies, discuss key contemporary issues, understand the historical roots of Latin American dilemmas and challenges, and explore the political implications for development and democracy in Latin America. The course includes journal keeping, group discussions, oral presentations and lectures presented by various experts.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Core designations: International-Global Prspct G, Humanities H  
HISP 311  -  U.S.-Latin American Relations,  4 credits.  

An analytical approach to reciprocal interactions between the United States and Latin America. Key historical events and themes will be highlighted, such as territorial expansion, security needs, economic interests, political issues, domestic policies, drug trafficking, immigration, and cultural expressions. Original documents created in both regions will add to a more balanced view of different dimensions of this relationship. This course can also count toward the global studies program.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Core designations: Humanities H  
HISP 320  -  Mexican American Border Studies,  4 credits.  

Using a comparative and multidisciplinary focus, this course will examine issues pertinent to the Mexican-American border. Major topics include immigration, history of the border States (focusing in the state of Texas), Chicano culture and language, gender roles, family life, work and issues affecting ethnic identity.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
HISP 380  -  Special Topics,  0-4 credits.  

Courses covering various topics of interest in this particular discipline are offered regularly. Contact department chair for more information.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
HISP 390  -  Cooperative Education,  1-8 credits.  
Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
HISP 480  -  Independent Study,  1-4 credits.  

This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct in-depth study of a particular topic under the supervision of a faculty member. Contact the department chair for more information.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
HISP 487  -  Directed Research,  1-4 credits.  

This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct research in a specific area of study, completed under the direction of a faculty mentor. Specific expectations of the research experience to be determined by the faculty. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  

Italian

ITAL 111  -  Beginning Italian,  4 credits.  

An introductory course that will acquaint students with basic Italian grammar and vocabulary. This is intended to be the first course in a two-course sequence that concludes with Accelerated Italian immersion course in Italy. Combines active practice and communication with grammatical analysis of the language.

Frequency: Alternate Years - 2nd Semester  
ITAL 112  -  Accelerated Italian,  4 credits.  

A summer study abroad course with immersion in Italian language and culture that completes the sequence designed to introduce students to the skills needed for proficiency in the language. Combines active practice and communication with grammatical analysis of the language, daily conversation and cultural enrichment experiences.

Frequency: Alternate Years-1st Summer Ses  
Prerequisites: ITAL 111  
Core designations: World Language W  

Spanish

SPAN 111  -  Beginning Spanish I,  4 credits.  

The first semester of a two-course sequence designed to introduce students to the skills needed for proficiency in the language and cultures of Spanish-speaking countries. Classroom sessions are supplemented with instructional technology. Emphasis is on reading and listening comprehension and oral and written communication in Spanish.

Frequency: Every Semester  
SPAN 112  -  Beginning Spanish II,  4 credits.  

The second semester of a two-course sequence designed to introduce students to the skills needed for proficiency in the language and cultures of Spanish-speaking countries. Classroom sessions are supplemented with instructional technology. Emphasis is on reading and listening comprehension and oral and written communication in Spanish.

Frequency: Every Semester  
Prerequisites: SPAN 111  
Core designations: World Language W  
SPAN 113  -  Accelerated Beginning Spanish,  4 credits.  

Designed for students with some previous study of Spanish, experience in a Spanish-speaking country, or study of another Romance language. It will develop existing language skills to form a solid foundation of the Spanish language and the Hispanic culture. This class requires students' substantial commitment and study both in and out of the class. Prerequisite: Placement score between 110 and 199 points

Frequency: Every Semester  
Core designations: World Language W  
SPAN 211  -  Intermediate Spanish I,  4 credits.  

Exposes students to the diversity found in the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Students refine oral and written communication skills through oral presentations, group activities, cultural readings, essays and a thorough examination of Spanish grammar. Conversation groups with the native assistants outside class time are required.

Frequency: Every Semester  
Prerequisites: SPAN 112 or SPAN 113  
Core designations: U.S. Cultural Diversity U, World Language W  
SPAN 212  -  Intermediate Spanish II,  4 credits.  

Exposes students to the diversity found in the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Students refine oral and written communication skills through oral presentations, group activities, cultural readings, essays and a thorough examination of Spanish grammar. Conversation groups with the native assistants outside class time are required.

Frequency: Every Semester  
Prerequisites: SPAN 211  
Core designations: International-Global Prspct G, World Language W  
SPAN 222  -  Latin American Culture and Civilization,  4 credits.  

College credit course offered at Concordia Language Villages for advanced high school juniors and seniors, focusing on the historical antecedents that influenced contemporary culture and civilization, exploring political, social and artistic developments affecting the image of nations and reality of governments in modern Latin America.

Frequency: Summer Session  
SPAN 250  -  Pre-May Seminar to Latin America or Spain,  2 credits.  

This course, an overview of the cultures and geography of Latin America, is designed to prepare students for a meaningful experience of travel and learning in Spanish-speaking countries. Students will begin a research project in their individual area of interest to be completed with follow-up research in Latin America. Appropriate travel vocabulary is also reviewed. This course can also count toward the global studies program.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Prerequisites: SPAN 112  
SPAN 300  -  May Seminar,  4 credits.  

This course can also count toward the global studies program.

Frequency: May Seminar  
SPAN 311  -  Spanish Composition & Grammar,  4 credits.  

A study of specific Spanish Grammar topics applied to different formats of writing in Spanish, such as descriptions, journalistic chronicles, narrative essays, literary criticism, among others. Each of these formats will allow students to explore grammatical nuances in order to increase accuracy in oral and written expression in the Spanish language.

Frequency: Every Semester  
Prerequisites: SPAN 212  
Core designations: World Language W  
This course is PEAK Optional  
SPAN 312  -  Conversation and Film in the Hispanic World,  4 credits.  

This course focuses on developing conversational skills. Language and culture are integrated through a variety of stimulating activities. Through Spanish-language films, students will learn about social, political, economic and cultural issues that have shaped the identity of Hispanic countries. Oral assignments include speeches, debates, discussions and peer teaching, as well as a weekend immersion experience at Concordia Language Villages. Students may apply this course to fulfill either the humanities or world language core designation, but not both.

Frequency: Every Semester  
Prerequisites: SPAN 212  
Core designations: Humanities H  
This course is PEAK Optional  
SPAN 326  -  Appreciating Hispanic Literature,  4 credits.  

A survey of major works from both Spanish and Latin American writers, this course introduces students to basic methods of literary analysis and various critical approaches to the study of narrative fiction, poetry and drama. Students may apply this course to fulfill either the arts or world language core designation, but not both.

Frequency: Every Semester  
Prerequisites: SPAN 311 and SPAN 312  
Core designations: Arts R  
SPAN 331  -  Business Spanish,  4 credits.  

A course designed for students interested in using Spanish for a business-related career. Cross-cultural management skills, international economic trends and international marketing theory appropriate to the Hispanic business world are emphasized. This course must be completed prior to the semester abroad internship in Mexico City. This course can also count toward the global studies program.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Prerequisites: SPAN 312 or SPAN 311  
Core designations: International-Global Prspct G, World Language W  
SPAN 332  -  Introduction to Translation,  4 credits.  

An introduction to the theory, methods, techniques and challenges encountered in translation from English to Spanish and Spanish to English. Contextualized Translation of documents and reports related to professions and academic disciplines form a major component of the course.

Frequency: Alternate Years - 1st Semester  
Prerequisites: SPAN 311  
Core designations: World Language W  
SPAN 333  -  Spanish for Health Professions,  4 credits.  

Designed for students who have health-related majors or minors, this course addresses the need of health care providers to understand the language and culture of the patients with whom they come in contact. Students learn about medical terminology as well as ethics as practiced in the U.S. and in Spanish-speaking countries.

Frequency: Every Year - Second Semester  
Prerequisites: SPAN 311 SPAN 312  
Core designations: World Language W  
SPAN 335  -  Advanced Oral Communication,  2 credits.  

The objective of this course is to develop speaking skills in Spanish in both formal and informal discourse. Formal, precise speech is practiced through mock trials. Informal speech is practiced in conversation, debates and other class activities.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Prerequisites: SPAN 312  
SPAN 343  -  The Culture of Spain,  4 credits.  

A study of Spain's rich cultural and artistic heritage and political development from prehistoric times to the present. This course can also count toward the global studies program.

Frequency: Alternate Years - 2nd Semester  
Prerequisites: SPAN 311 or SPAN 312  
Core designations: World Language W  
SPAN 344  -  Latin American Historical and Cultural Perspectives,  4 credits.  

Focusing on Latin America's culture and civilizations, this course analyzes the shaping of these countries, including contributions made by different ethnic groups, the road to independence, internal and external conflicts, the search for identity, and major achievements. This course can also count toward the global studies program.

Frequency: Alternate Years - 2nd Semester  
Prerequisites: SPAN 311 or SPAN 312  
Core designations: World Language W  
SPAN 370  -  Global Political, Social, Economic and Environmental Issues in the Spanish-Speaking World,  3,4 credits.  

Students develop greater understanding of global political, social, economic, and environmental issues through intensive study of authentic target language materials. Through projects, papers, presentations, and opportunities to collaborate with native speakers, participants develop intercultural communicative competence and target-language proficiency. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Intermediate or Advanced proficiency in the target language required.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis, Summer Session  
Repeatable: Yes  
SPAN 380  -  Special Topics,  0-4 credits.  

Courses covering various topics of interest in this particular discipline are offered regularly. Contact department chair for more information.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
SPAN 386 / PSC 386  -  Modern Spain: A Critical Look,  4 credits.  

Offered as part of the fall semester program in Segovia, Spain, this course examines a series of moral and ethical questions raised by modern Spanish history, from the Spanish Civil War and a study of the ideologies in conflict, the participation of American volunteers in the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, U.S. government policy during the war, aspects of the 36-year dictatorship of General Francisco Franco, population movements, the political assassination of Franco's hand-picked successor, Basque nationalism and ETA terrorism (the latter of which originated during the Franco regime), to the Spain after the transition to democracy, the Spain of the European Union and the global world. This course can also count toward the global studies program.

Frequency: Every Year - First Semester  
Prerequisites: SPAN 312 (may be taken concurrently)  
SPAN 390  -  Cooperative Education,  1-8 credits.  
Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
SPAN 395  -  Cooperative Education at the Concordia Language Villages,  1-4 credits.  

This course is intended to provide students of modern languages with opportunities to teach and study the language of their choice at the Concordia Language Villages. Prerequisite for acceptance: at least two years of course work or the equivalent in the language. The final decision on acceptance into this course is based on mutual agreement of both Concordia language department faculty and Concordia Language Village faculty concerning both the student and the project. A total maximum equivalent of two full courses from 390 and 395 may be counted toward graduation.

Frequency: Every Semester  
Corequisites: PEAK 400  
This course is PEAK Required  
SPAN 414  -  Topics in Latin American Lit,  4 credits.  

Selected topics whose main focus is a thorough understanding and interpretation of literary, cultural, historical, and societal factors that give shape to Latin America. Concentration could be on a period, a literary genre, a literary movement, a thematic unit, representative texts, representative authors or an author in particular. Repeat credit is allowed for varying topics. This course can also count toward the global studies program.

Frequency: Every Third Semester  
Prerequisites: SPAN 311 and SPAN 312  
Repeatable: Yes  
SPAN 424  -  Topics in Spanish Literature,  4 credits.  

Selected topics addressing the nature and complexity of thought, aesthetics, and social reality in any period of Spanish history, as exemplified by a particular group of literary texts. All activities conducted in Spanish. Topics could focus on a selected genre or period, a major literary figure, a canonical work, a theme or a Spanish play performance, including the study of dramatic literature related to the play to be performed. Repeat credit is allowed for varying topics. This course can also count towards the global studies program.

Frequency: Every Third Semester  
Prerequisites: SPAN 311 and SPAN 312  
Repeatable: Yes  
SPAN 425  -  Hispanic Women Writers,  4 credits.  

A study of contemporary Spanish and Latin American women writers with emphasis on feminist literary theory. This course can also count toward the Women and Gender Studies Program.

Frequency: Every Third Semester  
Prerequisites: SPAN 311 and SPAN 312  
SPAN 480  -  Independent Study,  1-4 credits.  

This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct in-depth study of a particular topic under the supervision of a faculty member. Contact the department chair for more information.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
SPAN 487  -  Directed Research,  1-4 credits.  

This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct research in a specific area of study, completed under the direction of a faculty mentor. Specific expectations of the research experience to be determined by the faculty. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
SPAN 490  -  Practicum,  1-4 credits.  

A living and learning experience in a Spanish-speaking country characterized by living with native speakers, typically a host family, and participating in the culture through study and/or volunteer work. A journal and final project are required.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Corequisites: PEAK 400  
This course is PEAK Required  

World Languages and Cultures

WLC 111  -  Beginning [Language] I,  3,4 credits.  

Designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of the language, this course reinforces the four acquisition skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing across all modes of communication. It also develops intercultural communicative competence as students get to know the cultures, history, and peoples who speak the target language around the world and in the United States.

Frequency: Summer Session  
Repeatable: Yes  
WLC 113  -  Accelerated Beginning [Lang],  4 credits.  

Designed for students with some previous study of the target language, experience in the target language-speaking country, or study of another language, this course develops existing language skills to form a solid foundation of the target language and target language-speaking cultures. Students learn to communicate in the target language and about different target language-speaking cultures to develop greater intercultural competence.

Frequency: Summer Session  
Core designations: World Language W  
WLC 317 / FREN 317  -  Race, Gender, and Power in the Francophone World,  4 credits.  

This course, taught in English, examines Francophone texts from a variety of media to understand better the impact of power, racial, gender, and economic relationships on the French-speaking world from a historical/contemporary perspective. We cover Africa, the Americas, Asia and Europe. This course counts toward the global studies, women & gender studies, and international business programs.

Frequency: Every Third Year  
Core designations: U.S. Cultural Diversity U, Humanities H  
WLC 370  -  Global Political, Social, Economic and Environmental Issues in the XXX-Speaking World,  3,4 credits.  

Students develop greater understanding of global political, social, economic, and environmental issues through intensive study of authentic target language materials. Through projects, papers, presentations, and opportunities to collaborate with native speakers, participants develop intercultural communicative competence and target-language proficiency. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Intermediate or Advanced proficiency in the target language required.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis, Summer Session  
Repeatable: Yes  
WLC 380  -  Special Topics,  0-4 credits.  

Courses covering various topics of interest in this particular discipline are offered regularly. Contact department chair for more information.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
WLC 390  -  Cooperative Education,  1-8 credits.  
Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
WLC 395  -  Language & Culture at CLV,  1-4 credits.  

A coop experience spending four weeks immersed in a language and culture not regularly taught on campus. Students serve as unpaid interns assisting the staff while learning the language. The dean of the specific village and a Concordia faculty member with some connection to the language will supervise the experience.

Frequency: Every Semester  
Corequisites: PEAK 400  
This course is PEAK Required  
Repeatable: Yes  
WLC 430  -  Topics in German Literature,  4 credits.  

Examines German literature with a focus on literary movements, genres, and representative works from major authors. Special attention given to sociohistorical contexts. The course will be conducted in German and English online with synchronous virtual classroom and threaded discussion forums. Students may take the course in English only or with German-language component.

Frequency: Alternate Years - 2nd Semester  
Core designations: Arts R  
Repeatable: Yes  
WLC 480  -  Independent Study,  1-4 credits.  

This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct in-depth study of a particular topic under the supervision of a faculty member. Contact the department chair for more information.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes  
WLC 487  -  Directed Research,  1-4 credits.  

This course provides an opportunity for individual students to conduct research in a specific area of study, completed under the direction of a faculty mentor. Specific expectations of the research experience to be determined by the faculty. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Frequency: Not offered on a Regular Basis  
Repeatable: Yes