Core Curriculum Requirements

The Core Curriculum consists of the following:

  • First-Year Experience courses: 4 courses
  • Religion I: 1 course
  • Exploration courses: 7-8 courses
  • Religion II: 1 course
  • Perspectives courses: 2 courses

For a complete listing of approved courses, see the Core Curriculum Course List. The core designation is listed at the bottom of the course description.  Courses used to fulfill Core requirements are not eligible for the pass-fail grading option.

First-Year Experience Courses

INQ 100: Inquiry Seminars

These seminars are designed to introduce students to the world of scholarship through intensive, collaborative investigations of innovative topics. Excitement and challenge characterize these courses as students are invited to be co-inquirers into topics and problems that have impassioned their professors. Inquiry Seminars are devoted to helping students develop critical thinking skills and fostering a lifelong love of learning. These writing-intensive courses emphasize the foundational and transferable skills of data collection, assumption analysis, thesis construction, and argument development.

First-time, full-time degree-seeking college students must take Inquiry 100 during their first semester, unless they enter Concordia with college credit for an equivalent course. Students who enter Concordia with sophomore or higher standing, and who have been a full-time, degree-seeking student at a college or university prior to coming to Concordia, are not required but may opt to take INQ 100. 

IOC 100 Inquiry: Oral Communication

In the Oral Communication courses, students will learn to produce and critique messages in public speaking and group settings. These courses will emphasize the oral applications of critical thinking strategies: research techniques, citation methods, information and persuasive message goals, and the roles and functions of group members and leaders.

All students must take the Core IOC course, unless they enter Concordia with college credit for an equivalent course. Students who enter Concordia with credit for a college public speaking course that is not equivalent to IOC 100 Inquiry: Oral Communication, or students who have extensive experience in competitive forensic public speaking, have two options to fulfill the IOC requirement:

Option 1 is to enroll in IOC 100 Inquiry: Oral Communication in either the fall or spring semester during the first year. In the spring, the student will take the course not taken in the fall, either IOC 100 Inquiry: Oral Communication or IWC 100 Inquiry Written Communication.

Option 2 is to enroll in an advanced speaking or small group communication course, preferably in the first year. The advanced speaking courses may be taken either in the fall or spring semester, depending on when they are offered. Students with competitive forensics experience should contact the CSTA department to determine whether Option 2 is a good choice in their specific case.

Qualifying advanced speaking courses include:

COM 305Business and Professional Speaking4
COM 308Communication for Citizenship and Career4
COM 314Group Communication and Team Building4

IWC 100 Inquiry Written Communication

This introductory writing course develops transferable skills and intellectual capacities inherent in the eight habits of mind necessary to critical thinking and well-crafted writing: Curiosity, Openness, Engagement, Creativity, Persistence, Responsibility, Flexibility, and Metacognition. The course includes practice in information literacy and argument, and students creatively remix one essay to experience writing in a different form. A field research component supports Concordia’s Core mission to responsibly engage in the world. IWC 100 does not count toward an English major or minor.

All students must take the Core IWC course, unless they enter Concordia with college credit for an equivalent course. Students who enter Concordia with credit for a college composition course that is not equivalent to IWC 100 Inquiry Written Communication have two options to fulfill the IWC writing requirement:

Option 1 is to enroll in IWC 100 Inquiry Written Communication or IOC 100 Inquiry: Oral Communication in either the fall or spring semester during the first year. In the spring, the student will take the course not taken in the fall, either IOC 100 Inquiry: Oral Communication or IWC 100 Inquiry Written Communication.

Option 2 is to enroll in an advanced writing class, preferably in the first year. The advanced writing courses may be taken either in the fall or spring semester, depending on when they are offered.

Qualifying advanced writing courses include:

ENG 267The Ethnographic Essay4
ENG 316Business Writing4
ENG 317News Writing4
ENG 318Feature Writing4
ENG 324Technical Writing4
ENG 380Special Topics (in Writing)4

Holistic Health

This course (PED 111 Wellness), normally taken in a student’s first year, is designed to teach health-related fitness and to encourage a lifelong pattern of physical fitness.

Religion I

REL 200Christianity and Religious Diversity4

This course should be taken during the student’s first or second year.

Exploration Courses

These courses constitute the heart of the Concordia Core Curriculum. They are designed to provide students with the breadth of knowledge and experience that characterize the well-educated liberal arts student. They are also designed to assure that Concordia students are prepared to be responsibly engaged in the affairs of the world. No one part of the Core Curriculum can accomplish these goals individually, but the whole of the Core can do so. Consequently, students are required to take courses in the four areas of the Core:

  • Natural Sciences and Mathematics (8 credits) – one course in natural sciences and one course in mathematics
  • Social Sciences (8 credits) – two courses in the social sciences
  • World Language (4-8 credits) – one course is required at the second-semester level.  All students who have studied a world language on the course list prior to coming to Concordia should take a placement test to determine which course level is the most appropriate.  Students testing into a language level beyond the second semester may take a higher-level course to fulfill this requirement.  
  • Arts and Humanities (8 credits) – one course in the arts and one course in the humanities

No more than one course from a single department or program may be taken to satisfy the Exploration requirement in the Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Arts and Humanities, and the Social Sciences. One course must be at the 300 level and preferably taken in the junior or senior year. A wide variety of courses are available to students in their pursuit of these requirements.

Religion II

An advanced religion course (300 level) is required in the student’s junior or senior year. No student should enroll in the second religion course without taking REL 200 first.  Any exception to this course sequence needs the approval of the religion department prior to registration for the second required religion course.  See the Core Curriculum Course List for religion courses that meet the Religion II core requirement. Religion II credit will not be awarded for 300-level courses that are not on the Core Curriculum Course List.  No exceptions will be granted. 

Perspectives Courses

Perspectives-designated courses are designed to help students understand the global and increasingly interdependent character of the world. The perspectives courses will help them to see that no position is without a perspective and no policy is without an assumptive base. Students are required to take two courses with a Perspectives designation:

  • U.S. Cultural Diversity – one course with a (U) designation
  • International and Global Perspectives – one course with a (G) designation

Core Curriculum Courses

Every student at Concordia College is required to take a body of courses known as the Core Curriculum to provide a solid foundation in the liberal arts. The courses listed below indicate the requirements and applicable courses. Please review the online class schedule to learn which courses are being offered each semester. In addition to the courses listed below, some study away programs have opportunities to fulfill selected Core requirements. Contact the Office of Global Learning for more details.

Important Core Curriculum Policies

  • Courses cannot be taken pass/fail to satisfy Core Curriculum requirements.
  • One of the Exploration courses must be taken at or above the 300 level, preferably in the junior or senior year.

Important Degree Requirement Reminders

In addition to the Core Curriculum Requirements detailed below, the following additional requirements are needed to complete a Concordia College degree:

  • A minimum of 126 credits overall
    • Of the 126 credits, a minimum of 40 credit hours must be at the 300 level or above
  • Two Pivotal Experiences in Applied Knowledge (PEAK)
  • Institutional GPA of 2.0 or above as well as a minimum GPA of 2.0 within major(s) and minor(s) - this includes concentrations where needed

See the Degree and Graduation Requirements section of the Catalog for more information.

First-Year Experience Courses

Inquiry Seminar

(Four semester credits or equivalent)

These in-depth courses emphasize the process of critical inquiry and student academic success.

INQ 100Critical Inquiry Seminar

Oral & Written Communication

(Four semester credits each or equivalent)

Inquiry Written Communication emphasizes academic writing as a way to learn, teach and participate in an academic community. In Inquiry Oral Communication, students learn to produce and critique reasoned and informed messages in public speaking and group settings.

IOC 100Inquiry: Oral Communication4
IWC 100Inquiry Written Communication4

Holistic Health

(One semester credit or equivalent)
PED 111Wellness1

Religion I

(One course that is four semester credits or equivalent)
REL 200Christianity and Religious Diversity4

Exploration Courses

One of the Exploration courses must be taken at or above the 300 level, preferably in the junior or senior year.

Natural Science

(One course that is four semester credits or equivalent)
BIOL 101General Biology4
BIOL 121Cell Biology4
BIOL 122Evolution and Diversity4
BIOL 350Animal Behavior4
BIOL 400Neurobiology4
BIOL 412Integrated Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology II4
BIOL 416Advanced Topics in Genetics4
CHEM 128General Chemistry II4
CHEM 171Consumer and Environmental Chemistry4
CHEM 174From Space to Deep Ocean: Chemistry at the Extremes of Nature4
CHEM 175Forensic Science-Where the Dead Do Tell Tales4
CHEM 330Analytical Chemistry I4
ENVR 103Ecosystems and Human Influence4
ENVR 107Islands as Microcosms of Our World4
ESC 104Introductory Astronomy: Solar System4
ESC 106Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Nebulae and Cosmology4
ESC 302Geology4
FND 114Food Safety4
NEU 109Introduction to Neuroscience4
NEU 400Neurobiology4
PHYS 104Introductory Astronomy: Solar System4
PHYS 106Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Nebulae and Cosmology4
PHYS 111General College Physics I4
PHYS 128Physics for Scientists and Engineers4
PHYS 153Science of Sound and Music4
BIOL 380 Genetics and Society

Mathematics

(One course that is four semester credits or equivalent)
BUSN 460Operations Mgmt/Research4
CSC 125Introduction to Computer Science4
CSC 335Operations Management/Research4
DATA 200Introduction to Data Analytics4
MATH 105Exploring Mathematics4
MATH 110Precalculus4
MATH 121Calculus I4
MATH 122Calculus II4
MATH 203Finite Mathematics4
MATH 205Introduction to Statistics4
MATH 207Discrete Mathematics4
MATH 223Calculus III4
MATH 311Differential Equations4
MATH 320Geometry4
MATH 335Operations Management/Research4
MATH 300Legacy of the Greeks4

Social Sciences

(Two courses - eight semester credits or equivalent. These courses must be from two different departments.)
BUS 201Principles of Global Economics4
BUSN 312Global Development Issues4
COM 111Introduction to Communication Studies4
EDUC 330Comparative Education: A Policy Perspective4
ENVR 312Global Development Issues4
ENVR 335Climate Change and Conflict4
FND 321Nutrition4
GS 117International Issues and Global Governance: An Introduction to Global Studies4
PSC 111Hot Topics in Political Science4
PSC 211U.S. Political System4
PSC 256Comparative Politics4
PSC 311Methods and Techniques of Political Analysis4
PSC 335Climate Change and Conflict4
PSC 338Chinese Politics4
PSC 393Public Policy4
PSYC 111Introductory Psychology4
PSYC 206Developmental Psychology4
PSYC 212Educational Psychology4
PSYC 324Drugs and Behavior4
PSYC 351Social Psychology4
SOC 111Human Society4
SOC 214Social Problems4
SOC 306London: The Global City4
SOC 312Global Development Issues4
SOC 322Crime, Deviance, and Social Control4
SOC 328Class, Race, and Ethnicity4
SOC 339Urban Communities4
SOC 351Aging in Society4
SOC 356Social Change in Theory & Practice4
SWK 150Social Work and Social Justice4
SWK 350Comparative Cultural Encounter4
EDUC 300Ed vs. Training4

Humanities

(One course that is four semester credits or equivalent)
COM 317Rhetorical Theory and Criticism4
ENG 224Literature, Imagination and Empathy4
ENG 267The Ethnographic Essay4
ENG 315English Language, Historical and Analytical4
ENG 401Shakespeare and the English Renaissance0-4
ENG 451Postcolonial Literatures4
ENVR 310Nature's Place in U.S. History4
ENVR 339Environmental Ethics4
ENVR 363Sustainability in Germany4
FREN 317Race, Gender, and Power in the Francophone World4
FREN 331French Culture and Civilization4
GER 320German Cultural History in Overview4
GER 363Sustainability in Germany4
GRS 120Greek and Roman Mythology in Art and Literature4
GRS 320Black America and the Classical Tradition4
GS 118Culture, Identity, and Dialogue: An Introduction to Global Studies4
GS 210Introduction to Latin American Studies4
GS 220Asia in a Global Age: An Introduction4
HISP 210Introduction to Latin American Studies4
HISP 311U.S.-Latin American Relations4
HIST 111United States in Perspective to 18654
HIST 112United States in Perspective since 18654
HIST 131European History in Perspective to 15004
HIST 132European History in Perspective since 15004
HIST 151World in Perspective to 15004
HIST 152World in Perspective since 15004
HIST 301Greece and the Ancient Near East4
HIST 302Rome: Republic and Empire4
HIST 310Nature's Place in U.S. History4
HIST 311Religion & American Reform4
HIST 313Black American History4
HIST 314American Foreign Relations since 19004
HIST 315Indigenous Peoples of North America4
HIST 316U.S. Women's History4
HIST 317Scandinavian Immigration and Settlement in America4
HIST 318The Midwest: Local, State, and Regional Histories4
HIST 319Colonial America4
HIST 320Latin American History4
HIST 325Doing Digital History4
HIST 332Russia since 19174
HIST 337Reel Norden: Scandinavian History and Film4
HIST 341Foundations of East Asian Civilization4
HIST 342Modern East Asian History4
HIST 343History of the Japanese Islands4
HIST 344Women and Development: The Asian Experience4
HIST 352The Rise of Modern Africa4
HIST 360Food in Global History4
HIST 370Islam and the West: Historical Encounters4
HIST 373Arab-Israeli Conflict4
HIST 375Global Antisemitism4
MUS 232History of Western Music: Medieval to the Mid-19th Century4
PHIL 102Life's Big Questions: Introduction to Philosophy4
PHIL 110Thinking About Values4
PHIL 115Seeking Justice in an Unjust World4
PHIL 120Faith, Doubt and Mystery: Philosophy of Religion4
PHIL 311Ancient Philosophy4
PHIL 312Modern Philosophy4
PHIL 313American Philosophy4
PHIL 314Asian Philosophy4
PHIL 315Existentialism4
PHIL 339Environmental Ethics4
PHIL 341Philosophy of Race4
PSC 121Thinking about Politics: An Introduction to Political Science4
PSC 241International Politics4
SPAN 312Conversation and Film in the Hispanic World4
WLC 317Race, Gender, and Power in the Francophone World4
HUM 380Agents of Change: Power & Privilege Here and Now4

Arts

(One course that is four semester credits or equivalent)
ART 111Two-Dimensional Foundations4
ART 112Three-Dimensional Foundations4
ART 130Beginning Drawing4
ART 320Painting4
ART 330Ceramics4
ART 340Sculpture4
ART 350Printmaking4
ART 368Digital Photography4
ART 376Nordic Arts4
COM 139Appreciating Film4
COM 368Digital Photography4
EDUC 201Art Education: Elementary4
ENG 150Literature, Self, and Society4
ENG 160Global Literature and Human Experience4
ENG 165Global Literature and Environmental Justice4
ENG 227Foundations in Creative Writing4
ENG 439Film and Literature4
GER 330Introduction to German Literature and Film4
GER 362The German Art Song4
GER 430Topics in German Literature4
GRS 110Classical Literature in Translation4
HART 155History in Art I: Origins to the Early Renaissance4
HART 156History in Art II: Renaissance to Impressionism4
HART 158History in Art III: Post-Impressionism to the Digital Age4
HART 365Renaissance and Baroque Art4
HART 36918th and 19th Century Art in the East and West4
HART 374Art and Religion4
HART 375Women and Art4
HART 377Arts of Asia4
MUS 101Introduction to the Art of Music4
MUS 362The German Art Song4
PHIL 328Kierkegaard: Philosophy, Literature, Film0-4
PHIL 333Philosophy of Art4
PHIL 340Philosophy and Film4
SPAN 326Appreciating Hispanic Literature4
THR 101Introduction to Theatre4
THR 127Elements of Acting4
THR 334Theatre History I: Origins to Romanticism4
THR 336Theatre History II: Realism to Postmodernism4
WLC 430Topics in German Literature4
MUS 300Music of the Romantics4

World Languages

(One course that is four semester credits or equivalent at the second semester level or higher. See the World Languages FAQs for more information. )
CHIN 112Beginning Chinese II4
CHIN 113Accelerated Beginning Chinese4
CHIN 211Intermediate Chinese I4
CHIN 212Intermediate Chinese II4
CHIN 311Chin Conversation/Composition4
CHIN 312Advanced Writing and Conversation4
CHIN 385Topics in Chinese Society4
ELL 112American English Language and Culture II4
FREN 112Beginning French II4
FREN 113Accelerated Beginning French4
FREN 211Intermediate French I4
FREN 212Intermediate French II4
FREN 311Intensive Oral and Written Communication4
FREN 350Francophone Films4
FREN 360French in the Business World4
FREN 370Global Political, Social, Economic and Environmental Issues in the French-Speaking World3,4
GER 112Introduction to the German-Speaking World II4
GER 113Accelerated Beginning German3,4
GER 211Intermediate German I: Culture and Society through the Media4
GER 212Intermediate German II: Culture Through Literature4
GER 311Advanced Composition and Style4
GRK 212Beginning Greek II4
ITAL 112Accelerated Italian4
LAT 112Fundamentals of Latin II4
REL 212Biblical Hebrew II4
SPAN 112Beginning Spanish II4
SPAN 113Accelerated Beginning Spanish4
SPAN 211Intermediate Spanish I4
SPAN 212Intermediate Spanish II4
SPAN 311Spanish Composition & Grammar4
SPAN 331Business Spanish4
SPAN 332Introduction to Translation4
SPAN 333Spanish for Health Professions4
SPAN 343The Culture of Spain4
SPAN 344Latin American Historical and Cultural Perspectives4
WLC 113Accelerated Beginning [Lang]4
FREN 380Introduction to Translation & Interpretation

Perspectives Courses

U.S. Cultural Diversity

(One course that is four semester credits or equivalent)
ACT 301Social Activism: Making Change Happen4
COM 414Organizational Communication4
EDUC 212American Education in a Diverse World4
EDUC 425Education of the Exceptional Child2
ELL 211American English Language and Culture III4
ENG 350American Literature in Historical Contexts4
ENG 358Native American Literatures4
ENG 365Writing of Women4
ENVR 310Nature's Place in U.S. History4
FND 426Community Nutrition4
FREN 211Intermediate French I4
FREN 317Race, Gender, and Power in the Francophone World4
GRS 310Behind Closed Doors: Ancient Gender and Sexuality4
HIST 111United States in Perspective to 18654
HIST 112United States in Perspective since 18654
HIST 310Nature's Place in U.S. History4
HIST 313Black American History4
HIST 315Indigenous Peoples of North America4
HIST 316U.S. Women's History4
HIST 317Scandinavian Immigration and Settlement in America4
HIST 318The Midwest: Local, State, and Regional Histories4
HIST 319Colonial America4
NURS 352Maternal and Newborn Nursing4
PHIL 115Seeking Justice in an Unjust World4
PHIL 313American Philosophy4
PHIL 337Philosophy of Feminism4
PHIL 341Philosophy of Race4
PSC 211U.S. Political System4
PSYC 351Social Psychology4
PSYC 383Psychology of Gender4
REL 244Religion and Popular Culture4
REL 332American Religions: Natives and Immigrants4
SOC 111Human Society4
SOC 214Social Problems4
SOC 231Sociology of Families4
SOC 317Gender, Self and Society4
SOC 322Crime, Deviance, and Social Control4
SOC 328Class, Race, and Ethnicity4
SOC 339Urban Communities4
SOC 351Aging in Society4
SPAN 211Intermediate Spanish I4
SWK 150Social Work and Social Justice4
SWK 350Comparative Cultural Encounter4
THR 323Women and Theatre4
THR 336Theatre History II: Realism to Postmodernism4
WGS 201Women's and Gender Studies: Frameworks and Issues4
WLC 317Race, Gender, and Power in the Francophone World4
HUM 380Agents of Change: Power and Privilege Here and Now4

International and Global Perspectives

(One course that is four semester credits or equivalent)
BUSN 312Global Development Issues4
BUSN 451Global Marketing3
COM 316Intercultural Communication4
COM 326Global Cinema4
CSC 300May Seminar4
EDUC 330Comparative Education: A Policy Perspective4
ENG 160Global Literature and Human Experience4
ENG 165Global Literature and Environmental Justice4
ENG 224Literature, Imagination and Empathy4
ENG 360Dramatic Adaptation4
ENG 451Postcolonial Literatures4
ENVR 103Ecosystems and Human Influence4
ENVR 107Islands as Microcosms of Our World4
ENVR 312Global Development Issues4
ENVR 365Global Sustainability Issues4
FND 336Environmental Nutrition4
FREN 212Intermediate French II4
FREN 311Intensive Oral and Written Communication4
GEOG 201World Geography4
GER 211Intermediate German I: Culture and Society through the Media4
GER 212Intermediate German II: Culture Through Literature4
GER 311Advanced Composition and Style4
GER 362The German Art Song4
GS 118Culture, Identity, and Dialogue: An Introduction to Global Studies4
GS 210Introduction to Latin American Studies4
GS 220Asia in a Global Age: An Introduction4
GS 333Creating a Path to a Sustainable Community: Global Issues, Local Solutions4
GS 360Summer Field Study Abroad - Variable Topics4
HART 155History in Art I: Origins to the Early Renaissance4
HART 156History in Art II: Renaissance to Impressionism4
HART 158History in Art III: Post-Impressionism to the Digital Age4
HART 36918th and 19th Century Art in the East and West4
HART 374Art and Religion4
HART 375Women and Art4
HART 377Arts of Asia4
HISP 210Introduction to Latin American Studies4
HIST 151World in Perspective to 15004
HIST 152World in Perspective since 15004
HIST 320Latin American History4
HIST 332Russia since 19174
HIST 337Reel Norden: Scandinavian History and Film4
HIST 341Foundations of East Asian Civilization4
HIST 342Modern East Asian History4
HIST 343History of the Japanese Islands4
HIST 344Women and Development: The Asian Experience4
HIST 352The Rise of Modern Africa4
HIST 360Food in Global History4
HIST 370Islam and the West: Historical Encounters4
HIST 373Arab-Israeli Conflict4
HIST 375Global Antisemitism4
MATH 300May Seminar4
MUS 361World Musics4
MUS 362The German Art Song4
NURS 401Population Health in a Global Society0-4
PHIL 314Asian Philosophy4
PSC 325Russian Politics4
PSC 332U.S.-China Relations4
PSC 360International Security4
PSC 365Global Sustainability Issues4
PSC 441Ethics and International Relations4
PSYC 220Psychology and Culture4
PSYC 420Cross-Cultural Psychology4
REL 339World Christianity4
REL 340The Ethics of Aid and Development4
REL 370Religion in a Global Context4
REL 382Religion and the Body4
REL 392Religion and World Affairs4
SOC 217Cultural Anthropology4
SOC 306London: The Global City4
SOC 312Global Development Issues4
SPAN 212Intermediate Spanish II4
SPAN 331Business Spanish4
SWK 320Social Policy and Systems Perspective4
THR 334Theatre History I: Origins to Romanticism4
THR 335Non-Western Theatres and Cultures4
THR 360Dramatic Adaptation4
EDUC 300Education Down Under4
EDUC 300Ed vs. Training4
HIST 300Twin Faces of Fascism4
PSYC 300Exploring Lifespan Dev.in Middle East4

Religion II

REL 313Jesus the Jew-Jesus the Christ4
REL 314Paul: Apostle or Apostate4
REL 316The Good Life: Old Testament Perspectives4
REL 317Making Meaning: Reading, Interpreting and Teaching the Bible4
REL 319Trauma, Resistance, Resilience: Old Testament Perspectives4
REL 324The Legacy of Luther4
REL 325Studies in Religious History4
REL 326Christian Theologies and Ethics4
REL 328Catholicism4
REL 332American Religions: Natives and Immigrants4
REL 334Monotheisms: Abrahamic Traditions in the Modern World4
REL 338Religions of East Asia4
REL 339World Christianity4
REL 342God:The Question and the Quest4
REL 343Science and Religion4
REL 344Christian Ethics in Human Community4
REL 360Religion & Political Economy4
REL 362Approaching the Qur'an4
REL 363Dealing with Difference: Conflict and Cooperation in Early Christianities4
REL 370Religion in a Global Context4
REL 372Christian Spirituality4
REL 374Women's Religious History4
REL 379Religion, Race & Social Justice4
REL 382Religion and the Body4
REL 384Exploring Islam4
REL 386Religion in the Postcolonial World4
REL 387Religions of India4
REL 388Religion, Violence, and Nonviolence4
REL 393Religion and Ecology4